Julia D'Arcy : Essay   "...D’Arcy’s drawings conjure a similarly evocative poetry, but more lyrical, and nature-centered; instead of cannons, artichokes, rubber gloves, and starfish impaled on candlesticks, she has chosen as one of her primary motifs,   as O’Keefe did, as Ensor did, while imagining himself aged 140 — the skull. The human head bone has a distinguished résumé in art, from prehistoric magical burial practices, through medieval personifications of death in Bosch,  Bruegel, and Holbein, through seventeenth-century moralizing still-lives, through Picasso and Golub  (who, incidentally, to a fellow artist’s cool, formalist analysis, expostulated: “It’s a SKULL, goddamn it!”). D’Arcy joins this tradition and yet  moves beyond anthropomor- phism by using nonhuman  skulls, namely, those of the ancient Chelonian order of turtles. ..." __DeWitt Cheng Art Critic / Artist  /  Curator of Stanford Art Spaces / Art Editor:  San Francisco Art Magazine  / Art Ltd. Magazine    

Julia D'Arcy : Essay   "...D’Arcy’s drawings conjure a similarly evocative poetry, but more lyrical, and nature-centered; instead of cannons, artichokes, rubber gloves, and starfish impaled on candlesticks, she has chosen as one of her primary motifs,   as O’Keefe did, as Ensor did, while imagining himself aged 140 — the skull. The human head bone has a distinguished résumé in art, from prehistoric magical burial practices, through medieval personifications of death in Bosch,  Bruegel, and Holbein, through seventeenth-century moralizing still-lives, through Picasso and Golub  (who, incidentally, to a fellow artist’s cool, formalist analysis, expostulated: “It’s a SKULL, goddamn it!”). D’Arcy joins this tradition and yet  moves beyond anthropomor- phism by using nonhuman  skulls, namely, those of the ancient Chelonian order of turtles. ..." __DeWitt Cheng

Art Critic / Artist  /  Curator of Stanford Art Spaces / Art Editor:  San Francisco Art Magazine Art Ltd. Magazine